Friday, February 03, 2006

Ancient Wisdom


It is impossible to live a pleasant life without living wisely and well and justly. And it is impossible to live wisely and well and justly without living a pleasant life.

Epicurus
341 - 271 BC

6 comments:

JLB said...

Well said... I think that those who subscribe to Hobbes' idea that life is "short, nasty, and brutish" condemn themselves to that way of thinking and that way of living. It's easy to find all the things wrong with the world and be miserable; it is a much greater challenge to look for the things that are worth while in search of happiness.

knitti-me said...

Discovered you via Old old lady of the hills! I find your journey interesting and inspiring.

I graduated high school in 83, but did not pursue college. At times I regret it, but I traveled, married, had kids, etc....

I have a good job in a great industry, which has alowed me to advance despite my non-college education. But I still get the yen to pursue higher education. Perhaps when the kids leave home...

BarbaraFromCalifornia said...

Hmmm...In philosophy that would be called a tautological statement.
Nevertheless, it can still be true.

I like the design that Bochica made for you. He is such a sweetheart!

Dawner said...

Hey Mike the header looks great. There are never enough words of wisedom. If only we could all be so wise.

Ellen said...

How true! Life is much too short as it is.... why not strive for the pleasant path, and become well and wise on the journey.

neal said...

In your last post you talk about your desire to improve your writing. It seems that although there is still a large amount of writing being done it is becoming a lost art. Sure people can still write but there seems to be a lack of wisdom, everything is fiction, self help, or political commentraries.

I love reading the writings of our early fore-fathers. I think Jefferson was an excellent writer. One of the most eloquent things I have ever read was the Pre-Amble to the Declaration of Independence,
"Prudence, indeed, will dictate that governments long established, should not be changed for light and transient causes; and, accordingly, all experience [has] shown that mankind are more disposed to suffer while evils are sufferable than to right themselves by abolishing the forms to which they are accustomed. But, when a long train of abuses and usurpations, pursuing invariably the same object, evinces a design to reduce [the people] under absolute despotism, it is their right, it is their duty, to throw off such government, and to provide new guards for their future security."

It is simple and to the point but speaks with force and conviction of beliefs.

I wish more people wrote with the eloquence that you do. I probably not get as much done around the house as I do though.